by Thimar

INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

 

PARIS 8 UNIVERSITY IN SAINT DENIS – June 2018

 

Margins, Marginality, Marginalization and Contestation in Middle East and North Africa (MENA)

 

Call For Papers

 

(voir ci-dessous la version française)

 

The workshop “Margins, Marginalities, Marginalization and Contestation in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA)”, which is proposed here, will examine the margins and forms of marginalities, spatial, economic, social, cultural and political existing in the MENA, as well as the various processes of marginalization that produce them. A certain number of researchers analysing the realities of the MENA countries have in fact considered the « revolutionary » processes and the social movements that marked them during the last years, as emanating from the social and spatial margins, having largely found their roots and triggers in situations of various forms of marginality and in processes of increasing marginalization linked to the global evolutions of these countries (Ayeb H, 2011, Achcar G, 20013, Lamloum O, & Ali Ben Zina M , 20015, Abdelrahman M, 20015). During the workshop, we will reflect on the relevance of these polysemic notions, commonly used in both the common language and the social sciences.

 

The marginal situation of a space or a social category may, on the one hand, refer to their objective situation, stable over a medium-term duration, of non-integration in a structure and / or a dynamics concerning the other spatial entities or the social categories of the global society. It may also refer to a refusal of integration into the latter by those “marginalized » themselves (Colonna F, 1993). In these two cases, there is no articulation, no integration, of these social spaces or categories to the structures and dynamics of the global society.

 

The marginal situation of a space or a social category may also, on the other hand, constitute the result, the historical product – planned, deliberate or simply « objective » – of a complex process of domination involving their dispossession (Harvey D, 2003) and / or their exclusion, with or without stigma and « abjection » (Bush R, 2012). In this case, there was initial articulation and integration of these dominated social spaces or categories into the structures and dynamics of the global society, and their final marginality is then the result of a process of marginalization linked to their dispossession or exclusion and leading to disintegration or disarticulation from the system of which they were initially part (Bush & Ayeb, 2012).

 

The notion of the « marginality » of a space or a social category seems to have relevance only if opposed to real integration, by means of relations of different natures (including certain forms of domination such as exploitation), to a territorial or societal whole and to the other spaces and social categories that compose it. A spatial or social margin, defined according to one or more aspects (economic, social, « ethnic », cultural, political …), is formally part of a territorial or societal whole (national, for example) as it is comprised into the formal limits of the latter, but it is only juxtaposed to the other spaces or social categories that compose it, and is not actually or structurally integrated into this whole (much like the white margin of a page is part of the latter but is not articulated with the text, which contains internal elements articulated between them).

 

If one accepts this definition of marginality, several remarks are required, which we will discuss during the workshop:

 

1- All forms of domination effects do not necessarily lead to marginalization in the sense defined above: unlike dispossession or exclusion (processes that are marginalizing and generally impoverishing), economic exploitation presupposes, on the contrary, the sustained maintenance of an integration into the relations of production (in the frame of slavery, or of tributary or capitalist modes of production) within which exploitation happens (which may or may not be impoverishing). Another example: the dispossession of their land favors the integration of part of the dispossessed peasants into the capitalist wage-earning relations; but an other part of these landless peasants, those who have not been « reconverted » into the wage-earning system, will be truly marginalized, whereas as peasants with land, selling their agricultural surpluses, they were previously integrated, through the market, to the local, or even regional, economy.

 

2- Any condition of marginality is reversible: the unemployed reserve army of industrial workers is in a condition of marginality, but re-mobilisable within the labour force – and thus re-integrable – in case of economic recovery (this also shows that, paradoxically, marginality can be « functional » within the global society).

 

3- The condition of marginality does not necessarily mean the absence of material and symbolic resources, opportunities, agentivity and capabilities. It is necessary to be attentive to all the strategies deployed by the « marginals”, either to resist the conditions of their marginal life and to rearrange them so as to render them bearable, or even to manipulate them in order to develop alternative livelihood and way of life, which may contravene the standards and norms of global society (Bayat A, 2012 & Gurung and Kollmair, 2005).

 

4- Degrees may exist in marginalization: for example, « sub-integration » is used to describe the so-called « informal » urban neighbourhoods, which are marginal areas from an urbanistic point of view but are nevertheless far from being inhabited only by « marginal » social actors. Similarly, on another scale, one could speak of « periphery of the periphery » (in the terms of Wallerstein) to designate spaces that we have here called « margins », while the « periphery » is closely articulated to the « center ».

 

5- Finally, the situations of marginality and the processes of marginalization, apprehended here in an objectivist way, are also, of course, « interactive social constructions » involving performative representations, which, through various social devices, participate in producing the social reality that they are supposed only to describe.

 

The play on these different notions and distinctions and on their complex relations will enable us to characterize and analyse as finely as possible the situations and processes addressed by the participants. The contributions will all be based on field research carried out in the Middle East countries and centred on themes related to the topic of the workshop. Various forms of margins, marginalities and marginalization will be explored from case studies at various spatial and social scales and will be linked to the overall political, economic, social and cultural structures and dynamics that characterized the MENA countries in recent decades.

 

Topics that could be addressed include:

  • Socio-spatial margins (Moroccan Rif, Southern Tunisia, Upper Egypt, Darfour…);
  • Sub-integrated suburban districts;
  • Internally displaced persons, refugees, “economic migrants”, urban marginalized people (homeless, street children…);
  • Social and political marginalities and processes of stigmatization (based on religion, ethnicity, sexual or political orientation…);
  • Phenomena of marginalization linked to unequal access to resources and services (small peasants, precarious workers, landlocked territories…);
  • Geopolitical marginalities (« Arab » countries at the margin: Mauritania, Sudan, Somalia, Yemen, Djibouti…)
  • The list can be completed…

 

Biblio :

  • Abdelrahman Maha (20015) Egypt’s Long Revoltion; Protest Movements and Uprisings. London & New York. Routledge.
  • Achcar Gilbert (2013) Le Peuple Veut ; Une Exploration Radicale du Soulèvement Arabe. Actes Sud.
  • Ayeb and Bush (2012) Marginality and Exclusion In Egypt; Zed Book.
  • Ayeb Habib, (2011), “Social and political geography of the Tunisian revolution: the alfa grass revolution” In Review of African Political Economy (ROAPE).
  • Bayat Asef (2012). « Marginality: Curse or cure? » In Ayeb and Bush (ed) Marginality and Exclusion In Egypt; Zed Book.
  • Bush Ray (2012) « Marginality or Abjection? The Political Economy of Poverty Production in Egypt » in Ayeb and Bush (2012) Marginality and Exclusion In Egypt; Zed Book.
  • Colonna Fanny (1993), Être marginal au Maghreb, Paris, CNRS Éditions
  • Gurung, Ghana and Michael Kollmair. (2005). « Marginality: Concepts and their Limitations ». IP6 Working Paper4. Development Study Group. Department of Geography. University of Zurich
  • Harvey David. (2003). The New Imperialism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Lamloum Olfa & Ali Ben Zina Mohamed (2015) Les Jeunes de Douar Hicher et d’Ettathamen ; Une Enquête Sociologique. Tunis.

 

 

The workshop will take place in June 2018 at Paris 8 – Vincennes University in Saint Denis (France) and will last three days. Within the limits of the possibilities, including financial ones, it is envisaged a participation turning around 25 contributions. Broad participation of scholars from countries of the Middle East is desired and will be promoted.

 

Contacts :

Habib Ayeb <habib.ayeb1@gmail.com>

Ireton François <iretonf2@live.fr>

 

Calendar:

– 15 August 2017: Dissemination of the call for papers.

– 31 October 2017: Submission of abstracts (one page maximum in French and English).

– 15 December 2017: Notification of acceptance of the presentation by the scientific committee.

– 28 February 2018: Final confirmation of participation.

– 31 March  2018: Submission of final versions (French & English) of the abstracts (for the printing of the workshop pamphlet).

– 13 – 15 June 2018: Provisional dates of the workshop (to be confirmed).


------

 

COLLOQUE INTERNATIONAL

 UNIVERSITÉ PARIS 8 À SAINT DENIS – Juin 2018

 Marges, marginalité, marginalisation et contestation en Afrique du Nord et Moyen Orient (ANMO)

Appel à Communications

 

Organisateurs/Organizers :

Habib Ayeb, géographe, Université Paris 8 à Saint Denis

François Ireton, sociologue, CNRS

Sami Zemni, sciences politiques et sociales, Université de Gand/Gent

Comité scientifique/Scientific Committee :

Agnès Deboulet, sociologue, Paris 8.

Alphonse Yapi-Diahou, géographe, Paris 8

Didier Le Saout, sociologue, Paris 8

François Ireton, sociologue, CNRS

Habib Ayeb, géographe, Paris 8

Hugo Pilkington, géographe, Paris 8

Ray Bush, économie politique, Leeds University.

Sami Zemni, sciences politiques et sociales, Université de Gand/Gent

Yasmine Berriane, sociologue du politique, Université de Zurich

 

Le colloque « Marges, marginalité, marginalisation et contestation en Afrique du Nord et Moyen Orient (ANMO) » dont on propose ici les grandes lignes s’interrogera sur les marges et les formes de marginalités, spatiales, économiques, sociales, culturelles et politiques existant en ANMO, ainsi que sur les divers processus de marginalisation qui les produisent. Un certain nombre de chercheurs analysant les réalités des pays concernés ont, en effet, considéré les processus « révolutionnaires » et les mouvements sociaux qui les ont marqués durant les dernières années, comme étant, pour certains, partis des marges sociales et spatiales, et comme ayant largement trouvé leurs racines et leurs déclencheurs dans des situations relevant de diverses formes de marginalité et dans des processus de marginalisation croissante liés aux évolutions globales de ces pays (Ayeb H, 2011 ; Achcar G, 20013 ; Lamloum O, & Ali Ben Zina M, 20015 ; Abdelrahman M, 20015) .Au cours du colloque on mènera en parallèle une réflexion sur la pertinence de ces notions polysémiques, couramment employées dans le langage commun comme dans celui des sciences sociales.

 

La situation de marginalité d’un espace ou d’une catégorie sociale peut, d’une part, renvoyer à leur situation objective, stable sur la moyenne durée, de non intégration à une structure et/ou à une dynamique concernant les autres entités spatiales ou catégories sociales de la société globale. Elle peut également renvoyer à un refus d’intégration à cette dernière de la part des « marginaux » eux-mêmes (Colonna F, 1993). Dans ces deux cas, il n’y a pas d’articulation, pas d’intégration, de ces espaces ou catégories sociales aux structures et dynamiques de la société globale.

 

La situation de marginalité d’un espace ou d’une catégorie sociale peut aussi, d’autre part, constituer l’aboutissement, le produit historique – planifié, volontaire ou simplement « objectif » – de processus complexes de domination impliquant leur dépossession (Harvey D, 2003) et/ou leur exclusion, accompagnées ou non de stigmatisation et « d’abjection » (au sens anglais de « rejet misérabilisant » ; Bush R, 2012). Dans ce cas, il y avait articulation et intégration initiales de ces espaces ou catégories sociales dominés aux structures et dynamiques de la société globale, et leur marginalité finale est alors le résultat d’un processus de marginalisation lié à leur dépossession ou leur exclusion et menant à une désintégration ou une désarticulation d’avec le système dont ils faisaient initialement partie (Bush & Ayeb, 2012).

 

La notion de « marginalité » d’un espace ou d’une catégorie sociale ne semble ainsi avoir de pertinence que si elle s’oppose à celle d’intégration réelle, par le biais de rapports de différentes natures (y compris certaines formes de domination comme l’exploitation), à un tout territorial ou sociétal et aux autres espaces et catégories sociales qui le composent. Une marge, spatiale ou sociale, définie selon un ou plusieurs aspects (économique, social, « ethnique », culturel, politique…) fait certes formellement partie d’un tout territorial ou sociétal (national, par exemple), car elle est comprise dans les limites formelles de ce dernier, mais elle n’est que juxtaposée aux autres espaces ou catégories sociales qui le composent, et n’est pas intégrée réellement ou structurellement à ce tout (un peu comme la marge blanche d’une page fait partie de cette dernière mais n’est pas articulée au texte qui, lui, contient des éléments internes articulés entre eux).

 

Si l’on admet cette définition de la marginalité, plusieurs remarques s’imposent, qui sont énoncées ici sur le mode affirmatif, mais qui le seront sur le mode interrogatif dans le cours du colloque :

 

1- Toutes les formes d’effets de la domination n’entraînent pas nécessairement la marginalisation au sens défini ci-dessus : contrairement à la dépossession ou à l’exclusion, processus qui sont marginalisants (et en général appauvrissants), l’exploitation économique suppose le maintient durable d’une intégration aux rapports de production (esclavagistes, tributaires ou capitalistes) au sein desquels s’opère cette exploitation (qui peut être ou non appauvrissante). Autre exemple : la dépossession de leurs terres favorise l’intégration d’une partie des paysans dépossédés aux rapports salariaux capitalistes ; mais une autre partie, ceux qui ne se seront pas « reconvertis » en salariés, seront quant à eux réellement marginalisés, alors qu’en tant que paysans dotés de terres et vendant leurs surplus agricoles, ils étaient auparavant intégrés, par le biais du marché, à l’économie locale, voire régionale.

 

2- Toute situation de marginalité est réversible : l’armée de réserve des chômeurs de l’industrie est en état de marginalité, mais remobilisable au sein de la force de travail – et donc réintégrable – à la faveur d’une reprise économique (ceci montre aussi que, paradoxalement, la marginalité peut être « fonctionnelle », au sein de la société globale).

 

3- L’état de marginalité ne signifie pas nécessairement l’absence de ressources, matérielles et symboliques, d’opportunités, d’agentivité et de capabilités ; il conviendra donc d’être attentif à toutes les stratégies déployées par les « marginaux », soit pour résister aux conditions de leur vie marginale et les aménager afin de les rendre à leurs yeux vivables, soit même pour en « jouer » et développer des modes de subsistance et de vie alternatifs, qui peuvent contrevenir aux normes de la société globale (Bayat A, 2012 & Gurung and Kollmair, 2005).

 

4- Des degrés peuvent exister dans la marginalisation : on parle par exemple de « sous-intégration » pour qualifier les quartiers urbains dits généralement « informels », espaces marginaux sur le plan urbanistique qui sont par ailleurs très loin de n’être habités que par des acteurs sociaux « marginaux » ; de même, à une autre échelle, on a pu parler de « périphérie de la périphérie » (dans les termes de Wallerstein) pour désigner les espaces ce que l’on a nommé ici « marges », alors que la « périphérie » est étroitement articulée au « centre ».

 

5- Enfin, les situations de marginalité et les processus de marginalisation, appréhendés ici sous un mode objectiviste, sont aussi, bien évidemment, des « constructions sociales interactives » impliquant des représentations performatives qui, par le biais de dispositifs sociaux divers, concourent à produire la réalité sociale qu’elles sont censées « constater ».

 

Le jeu sur ces différentes notions et distinctions et sur leurs relations complexes permettra de caractériser et analyser le plus finement possible les situations et processus abordés par les participant.e.s. Les contributions seront toutes basées sur des recherches de terrain effectuées dans des pays du Maghreb et/ou du Moyen Orient et centrées sur des thèmes relevant de la thématique centrale du colloque. A partir d’études de cas appréhendées à des échelles spatiales et sociales variées, diverses formes de marges, de marginalités et de marginalisation seront donc explorées et seront mises en relation avec les structures et dynamiques politiques, économiques, sociales et culturelles globales ayant caractérisé ces pays durant les dernières décennies.

 

A titre d’exemple on peut envisager des communications sur des thèmes tels que :

– Marges socio-spatiales (Rif marocain, Sud tunisien, Haute Egypte, Dafour…) ;

 

– Quartiers péri-urbains sous-intégrés ;

 

– Déplacés internes, réfugiés, « migrants économiques », marginaux urbains (sans-abris, enfants des rues…) ;

 

– Marginalités sociales et politiques et processus de stigmatisation (sur une base religieuse, ethnique, d’orientations sexuelles ou politiques…) ;

 

– Phénomènes de marginalisation liés aux conditions inégales d’accès aux ressources et services (petites paysanneries, travailleurs précaires, territoires enclavés…) ;

 

– Marginalités géopolitiques (pays « arabes » à la marge : Mauritanie, Soudan, Somalie, Yémen, Djibouti…).

 

– Liste pouvant être complétée.

 

Biblio :

  • Abdelrahman Maha (20015) Egypt’s Long Revoltion; Protest Movements and Uprisings. London & New York. Routledge.
  • Achcar Gilbert (2013) Le Peuple Veut ; Une Exploration Radicale du Soulèvement Arabe. Actes Sud.
  • Ayeb and Bush (2012) Marginality and Exclusion In Egypt; Zed Book.
  • Ayeb Habib, (2011), “Social and political geography of the Tunisian revolution: the alfa grass revolution” In Review of African Political Economy (ROAPE).
  • Bayat Asef (2012). « Marginality: Curse or cure? » In Ayeb and Bush (ed) Marginality and Exclusion In Egypt; Zed Book.
  • Bush Ray (2012) « Marginality or Abjection? The Political Economy of Poverty Production in Egypt » in Ayeb and Bush (2012) Marginality and Exclusion In Egypt; Zed Book.
  • Colonna Fanny (1993), Être marginal au Maghreb, Paris, CNRS Éditions
  • Gurung, Ghana and Michael Kollmair. (2005). « Marginality: Concepts and their Limitations ». IP6 Working Paper4. Development Study Group. Department of Geography. University of Zurich
  • Harvey David. (2003). The New Imperialism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Lamloum Olfa & Ali Ben Zina Mohamed (2015) Les Jeunes de Douar Hicher et d’Ettathamen ; Une Enquête Sociologique. Tunis.

 

 

Ce colloque aura lieu fin juin 2018 à l’Université Paris 8 – Vincennes à Saint Denis et durera trois jours. Dans la limite des possibilités, y compris financières, on envisage une participation tournant autour de 25 contributions. Une large participation des chercheur.e.s venant des pays du Maghreb et du Moyen Orient est souhaitée et sera favorisée.

 

Contacts :

Habib Ayeb <habib.ayeb1@gmail.com>

Ireton François <iretonf2@live.fr>

Calendrier :

– 15 août 2017 : Diffusion de l’appel à communications.

– 31 Octobre 2017 : Réception des résumés (une page maximum en français et en anglais).

– 15 Décembre 2017 : Notification d’acceptation de la communication par le comité scientifique.

– 28 Février 2018 : Confirmation définitive de participation.

– 31 Mars 2018 : Envoi des versions définitives (en français & anglais) des résumés/abstracts (en vue de la fabrication de la brochure du colloque).

– 13 – 15 Juin 2018. : Dates provisoires de tenue du colloque (à confirmer).

Date: 2017-09-06


comments powered by Disqus
Search
PhotoGallery
Latest news
Le colloque s’interrogera sur les marges et les formes de marginalités, spatiales, économiques, sociales, culturelles et politiques existant en ANMO, ainsi que sur les divers processus de marginalisation qui les produisent. COLLOQUE INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITÉ PARIS 8 À SAINT DENIS – Juin 2018
The workshop will examine the margins and forms of marginalities, spatial, economic, social, cultural and political existing in the MENA, as well as the various processes of marginalization that produce them.
This post combines a number of articles and work on the conflict over dispossession of Nubian land in upper Egypt. The Dossier follows recent news of political action by Nubian activist fighting to prevent further dispossession of historical lands. This collection contains articles on the topic and will grow progressively.
Email subscription
New Video
Latest updates on facebook